Mid-Century Modern Furniture Then and Now - Paradigm Gallery Blog

Dame Zaha Mohammad Hadid 1950-2016

Posted by Lynne van den Berg On April 15th

With a sad heart I thought I would share some quotes, some posts and just a smattering of the rich legacy Zaha left behind….

 

 

Zaha Hadid: 'Would they still call me a diva if I was a man?' By Sheena McKenzie, CNN

                               Zaha Hadid: ‘Would they still call me a diva if I was a man?’
                                                     By Sheena McKenzie, CNN

“Zaha Hadid’s work transcended a specific gender, religion, culture or space.”

SyndiGate.info http://www.albawaba.com/via dezeen.com bit.ly/1WoibNy & pinterest
Zaha Hadid 1950-2016: following the death of Zaha Hadid, we’ve updated our Pinterest board dedicated to her buildings to include more of the Pritzker-Prize winning architect’s ambitious and critically-acclaimed work. https://www.pinterest.com/dezeen/zaha-hadid-architects/     #‎architecture‬ ‪#‎pritzger‬ ‪#‎architects‬ ‪#‎zaha‬ ‪#‎zahahadid‬ ‪#‎starchitects‬

zaha-hadid-architecture-lifetime-projects-pinterest-board-dezeen-sq                                        Images via Dezeen and Pinterest

 

 

“Her architecture was modern and futuristic with very noticeable sensuous lines, she brought a femininity to Modernism.”

BBC.com
‪#‎ZahaHadid‬ image via Curbed
The London aquatics centre built for the 2012 Olympic Games. Photograph: John Walton/PA
drawing 1980’s https://www.facebook.com/zaha.hadid/

Hadid 1

Rem Koolhaus “I think she made an enormous contribution as a woman, but her greatest contribution is as an architect.”

 

 

“Step into one of her best buildings, and you feel anything is possible” Amanda Baillieu

 

Zaha                         Nick Hufton and Allan Crow have shared their favourite images

Zaha Hadid 1950-2016    ParadigmGallery/facebook April 4,2016images via Dezeen : bit.ly/1RWTqF3Nick Hufton and Allan Crow have shared their favorite images of her buildings…via Spotlight Zaha Hadid
zaha-jadid-design2(Virgile Simon Bertrand, Courtesy of the RIBA Architecture & Zaha Hadid Architects)
zaha-hadid-design3       (Christian Richters, Courtesy of the RIBA Architecture & Zaha Hadid Architects)

 

 

“There are 360 degrees, so why stick to one?”                                           Zaha Hadid

“As a woman, I’m expected to want everything to be nice and to be nice myself. A very English thing. I don’t design nice buildings – I don’t like them. I like architecture to have some raw, vital, earthy quality.”                                      Zaha Hadid

Bauhaus color

Posted by Lynne van den Berg On March 23rd

The walls are painted to match the architectonic divisions of the room precisely. Just as the room is divided into two sections, the ceiling is divided into two rectangular fields of color.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: thecharnelhouse.org

great images and written as a diary….fabulous feeling of being there in that visit…touches on the philosophy of the Bauhaus Movement…fantastic!

Originally published as “Im Bauhaus,” Zwrotnica 12 (1927) . Translated from the Polish by Steven Lindberg. From Between Two Worlds: A Sourcebook of Central European Avant-Gardes, 1910-1930. (The MIT Press. Cambridge, MA: 2002).

See on Scoop.itMid-Century Modern Architects and Architecture

Architects and Their Chairs “J”

Posted by Lynne van den Berg On September 14th

  “J” is for Juhl

 

In Copenhagen, A Renaissance for Finn Juhl By Stephen Brookes • Modernism Magazine • Winter 2010

In Copenhagen, A Renaissance for Finn Juhl
        By Stephen Brookes • Modernism Magazine • Winter 2010

Finn Juhl (30 January 1912 – 17 May 1989) was a Danish architect, interior and industrial designer. Juhl was most notably known for his furniture design and for introducing Danish Modern to America in the 1940’s.

“Juhl’s life was, in fact, a roller coaster of fame and obscurity. High-profile projects in the 1940’s and 50’s (including the Trusteeship Council Chamber, the Danish ambassador’s residence in Washington, DC and all of SAS Scandinavian Airlines’ air terminals in Europe and Asia) brought him international recognition, and he organized many of the exhibitions — including the “Good Design” exhibit in Chicago in 1951, and another at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York in 1960.”                                                                                                           In Copenhagen, A Renaissance for Finn Juhl By Stephen Brookes • Modernism Magazine •

Salto & Sigsgaard. The restoration of the Finn Juhl–designed United Nations Trusteeship Council Chamber, New York. Photography by Hans Ole Madsen.

Salto & Sigsgaard. The restoration of the Finn Juhl–designed United Nations Trusteeship Council Chamber, New York. Photography by Hans Ole Madsen. Image via Salto and Sigsgaard pinterest

“One cannot create happiness with beautiful objects, but one can spoil quite a lot of happiness with bad ones” – Finn Juhl

 

Finn Juhl: Pelikan Take Sunset LA

Finn Juhl: Pelikan Take Sunset LA

 Pelikan is a wonderful example of Finn Juhl’s design. Inspired by the modern “free art” of the time, its organic shape and fluid lines are so inviting. . Via takesunset.com

Pelikan is a wonderful example of Finn Juhl’s design. Inspired by the modern “free art” of the time, its organic shape and fluid lines are so inviting. Via takesunset.com

 

Unlike many of his contemporaries in Scandinavia and the rest of Europe, Juhl was as interested in form as in function.  “A chair is not just a product of decorative art in a space,” he said. “It is a form and a space in itself.”  His  attention to form led him to design chairs where the seat is separate from the frame (images 5, 6 & 8) and sofas constructed out of floating shapes.http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/

 

Item Description Bwana Chair, designed by Finn Juhl, Denmark 1962. prod. by France and Son, Denmark 1962. teak. -via deconet.com

Item Description Bwana Chair, designed by Finn Juhl, Denmark 1962.
prod. by France and Son, Denmark 1962. teak. -via deconet.com

Juhl gave a soft edge to the lines of wooden modernist chairs, favoring organic shapes which often took the wood to the limits of what was possible. He generally used teak and other dark woods, unlike many of the other proponents of the Danish Modern movement who often used oak in their designs.

He was influenced by the abstract sculptor Jean Arp, an influence which is seen already in his early Pelican chair but it remained a motif throughout his career. Also influenced by tribal art, Juhl exhibited the Chieftain chair with photos of weapons from anthropological studies.   Wikipedia

Bradley: “Denmark is a Disneyland for adults, for design geeks.”

Modernist Architecture 

Blog post: Modernism through the eyes of an architectural photographer.  Darren Bradley and Denise Bradley visit Finn Juhl’s House, “a person’s house says so much about their character”.

 

Finn Juhl Architecture, Estate photo courtesy Finn Juhl Estate

Finn Juhl Architecture, Estate photo courtesy Finn Juhl Estate

 

Finn Juhl Homeoffice via Dansk Mobel Kunst http://www.dmk.dk/blog/page/2/

Finn Juhl Homeoffice via Dansk Mobel Kunst

 

Architects and Their Chairs “I”

Posted by Lynne van den Berg On May 14th

                         “I” is for Isozaki

Image via Architects Architecture Archtectuul

Image via Architects Architecture Archtectuul

Arata Isozaki was born in Oita City, Japan, in 1931. He studied with Kenzo Tange, one of Japan’s leading modern architects, at the University of Tokyo from 1950 to 1954.  He worked for Tange for a number of years and then went out on his own, but continued to collaborate with KT into the 70’s. This attitude is in keeping with native Japanese practices that stress collaboration and cooperation, rather than competition, among professionals. Encyclopedia.com

Architecture writer Martin Filler called Isozaki and his wife, sculptor Aiko Miyawaki, “true cultural citizens of the world.” Raised in a home where his businessman father wrote haiku poetry, he later was attracted toward the avant-garde and readily called his tastes “radical” in everything from music to literature. LA Times:Tastemakers

 

              Furniture & Architecture

 One can see how Japanese design is as much about emptiness as it is about structure – a perspective that comes naturally to the country that gave Zen Buddhism to the world. Japan-ness In Architecture  Arata Isozaki

“What is the essence of Japanese design? Perhaps it is best exemplified in the clean lines of the Marilyn Chair , designed by architect Arata Isozaki in 1972. Isozaki combined the curves of Marilyn with the narrow, vertical lines found in the Mackintosh high-back chair.”  Book: Japanese Design:A Survey Since 1950  Charles Rennie Mackintosh (1868-1928), was in turn influenced by Japanese design. In its curved side view, the chair makes reference to the body shape of Marilyn Monroe. The chair is constructed of bent laminated wood and a solid beech frame. It retains its original leather-covered upholsteredseat.  Denver Museum of Art

 

Marilyn Monroe Chairs image via www.invaluable.com

Marilyn Monroe Chairs image via www.invaluable.com

 

 

image via: Arata Isozaki at 1stdibs Oval Dining Table and Marilyn Monroe Chairs

image via: Arata Isozaki at 1stdibs
Oval Dining Table and Marilyn Monroe Chairs

 

 

A Pair of Arata Isozaki Monroe Chairs made of ebonized beech image via: https://www.aspireauctions.com/

A Pair of Arata Isozaki Monroe Chairs made of ebonized beech
image via https://www.aspireauctions.com/

 

 

 In 1963 he established Arata Isozaki & Associates, the base from which he continued to work ever since. From his 1960s work such as Oita Prefectural Library, to his 1990s work in locations as far afield as Barcelona, Orlando, Kraków, Nagi in Okayama Prefecture, Kyoto, Nara, La Coruña, Akiyoshidai in Yamaguchi Prefecture and Berlin, to his 21st century work in the Middle East, China, Central Asia, and elsewhere, Isozaki has created an architecture so personal in its ideas and spaces that it defies characterization in any single school of thought. At the same time he resists the temptation to apply a signature style to his jobs, preferring instead to create architectural solutions specific to the political, social and cultural contexts of the client and site in question.  YCAM Re-Mark

 

via Arch Daily Architects: Arata Isozaki Location: Barcelona, Spain Project Year: 2011 Photographs::© Filippo Poli

via Arch Daily
Architects: Arata Isozaki
Location: Barcelona, Spain
Project Year: 2011
Photographs:© Filippo Poli

 

Inflatable concert hall by Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki in Matsushima, Japan 52-Weeks-52-CIties-by-Iwan-Baan_Ark-Nova-Isozaki_dezeen_22 Baan is known for eschewing the traditional approach of shooting buildings in isolation. He says his aim with every shoot is to capture the life both within and surrounding the built environment.

Inflatable concert hall by Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki in Matsushima, Japan 52-Weeks-52-CIties-by-Iwan-Baan_Ark-Nova-Isozaki_dezeen_22  Baan is known for eschewing the traditional approach of shooting buildings in isolation. He says his aim with every shoot is to capture the life both within and surrounding the built environment.

 

GreatBuildings.com Image - Team Disney Building by ARATA ISOZAKI

GreatBuildings.com Image – Team Disney Building by ARATA ISOZAKI

 

Isozaki draws from a wide-ranging store of references. MOCA’s pyramid-shaped skylights do indeed reflect Egyptian pyramids, for instance, but they are also simple geometric forms. Influenced first by his teacher, the prominent Japanese architect Kenzo Tange, by Le Corbusier and, later, by Otto Wagner, the architect builds on rather than discards his traditional training.

 

Image via The Vintage Poster

Image via The Vintage Poster

 

As the first museum ever to be entirely dedicated to the human species, Domus shines as a source of pride for Galicia. Japanese architect Arata Isozaki designed the Domus complex, which contains a museum, restaurant and IMAX theater, to look like a ship sail. davidsbeenhere

Domus shines as a source of pride for Galicia. Japanese architect Arata Isozaki designed the Domus complex.

Domus shines as a source of pride for Galicia. Japanese architect Arata Isozaki designed the Domus complex

 

Arata Isozaki was instantly recognizable by his distinctive style of dress. He often wore traditional Japanese clothing, and he favored the color black. He appeared on the cover of the New York Times Magazine in 1986, dressed in a “dazzingly” fashionable Issey Miyake creation. By presenting himself as being sartorially distinct from the crowd, Isozaki provided a contemporary parallel to the flamboyant Frank Lloyd Wright, the famous American architect (and admirer of Japanese culture) who continued to affect Victorian dress long after it passed out of style. Encyclopedia.com

 

Bar Italia News Arata Isozaki

Bar Italia News Arata Isozaki

 

Irata Isozaki, Japanese architect, teacher and theorist. He will be remembered as the designer of such prestigious international projects as Barcelona’s Olympic Stadium, the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art, the Tokyo University of Art and Design, the Team Disney Building in Orlando, FL…..and the list goes on.

I feel compelled to share this other aspect to his architectural aesthetic that came up often in my research and should be considered when you look at his body of work. Being Japanese brought both light and darkness to the architecture.

 There is thus always an undercurrent of morbid scepticism lying beneath the exuberance of his aesthetic form—a darkness of spirit that became overt from time to time. In his Electric Labyrinth (1968), designed for the Triennale in Milan, for example, the exhibition was haunted by an image of the devastated Hiroshima, combined with traditional Japanese ghosts and demons representing the revengeful spirits of the nuclear disaster. MOMA.org

 

Iraklis/Tumblr

Iraklis/Tumblr

 

 

We work hard to accurately credit all of our resources, both words and images. If we have made any errors or omissions please contact us and we will correct our information.

Architects and Their Chairs “H”

Posted by Lynne van den Berg On February 26th

                      “H” is for Henningsen

 

Poul Henningsen, 1894-1967, Danish architect, writer, multi-artist. On the background of the emancipated radical cultural environment of the 1920s he displayed great inventiveness in many fields.
Poul Henningsen, 1894-1967, Danish architect, writer, multi-artist. On the background of the emancipated radical cultural environment of the 1920s he displayed great inventiveness in many fields.
Official website of Denmark

 

 — Poul Henningsen was born in Copenhagen in 1894. He never graduated as an architect, but studied at The Technical School at Frederiksberg, Denmark from 1911-14, and then at Technical College in Copenhagen from 1914

He started practicing traditional functionalistic architecture, but over the years his professional interests changed to focus mainly on lighting which is what he is most famous for. He also expanded his field of occupation into areas of writing, becoming a journalist and an author.    Living Edge

 

“1950s Poul Henningsen Artichoke Light, its kinda like an industrial/no frills version of a chandelier..” Ella Drake

 

Poul Henningsen Artichoke pendant light, 1958 by Louis Poulsen. / Case Da Abitare and tumblr
Poul Henningsen Artichoke pendant light, 1958 by Louis Poulsen. / Case Da Abitare and tumblr

 

 

His most valuable contribution to design was in the field of lighting. He designed the PH-lamp in 1925, which, like his later designs, used carefully analyzed reflecting and baffling of the light rays from the bulb to achieve glare-free and uniform illumination. Wikipedia

Quotes from PH

“From the age of 18, when I began to experiment with light, I have been searching for harmony in lighting”

 “It doesn’t cost money to light a room correctly, but it does require culture.”

Poul Henningsen did not grew up with the electric light but in the soft glow of the petroleum lamp. His constant inspiration and aim was to cultivate the electric light to achieve a similar softness but yet utilize this new powerful light source.

“I do not subscribe to the idea of an ever-increasing demand for more powerful lighting intensity. It is tempting, but inartistic to continue to increase lighting intensity.”

    From Consulate General of Denmark in New York Copyright 1997, Consulate General of Denmark. All rights reserved and Scandinavian Design

 

 

 

via archipanic.com/louis-poulsen-relaunch-ph-lamp/ At Stockholm Furniture Fair 2015, Danish architectural lighting manufacturer Luis Poulsen relaunched an iconic PH lamp designed in 1929 by maestro Poul Henningsen. The new limited edition of PH 3½-2½ comes with a opal glass or untreated copper shade that oxidates over time.

via archipanic.com/louis-poulsen-relaunch-ph-lamp/
At Stockholm Furniture Fair 2015, Danish architectural lighting manufacturer Luis Poulsen relaunched an iconic PH lamp designed in 1929 by maestro Poul Henningsen. The new limited edition of PH 3½-2½ comes with a opal glass or untreated copper shade that oxidates over time.

 

PH 5 http://www.topsonlighting.com/ph5-pendant-lamp
PH 5
Topson Lighting

 

 

 

 

               Poul Henningsen Chair Designs

 

PH Vintage Snake Chair

PH Vintage Snake Chair

 

Pope Chair

Pope Chair

 

Dining Chair

 

 

Poul Henningsen Sprawl Chair

Poul Henningsen Sprawl Chair

 

 

We will close this post with perhaps the most flamboyant and genius design of all in the portfolio of PH…..

The Magnificent Grand Paino by Poul Henningsen looks like it came from the distant future, yet it was designed in 1931, a true timeless design undeniably ahead of its time. He designed this Piano in steel, aluminum, red leather and plexiglass, thus creating a unique design that stands out on its right as a piece of art. http://www.designisthis.com/blog/en/post/poul-henningsen-grand-piano
The Magnificent Grand Paino by Poul Henningsen looks like it came from the distant future, yet it was designed in 1931, a true timeless design undeniably ahead of its time.
He designed this Piano in steel, aluminum, red leather and plexiglass, thus creating a unique design that stands out on its right as a piece of art. http://www.designisthis.com/blog/en/post/poul-henningsen-grand-piano

 

 

Creative genius Poul Henningsen introduced his mind-altering design in 1931 – and it still belongs to the future. Look ahead twenty years. Now look again. There is nothing else like it, and there never will be. It is the first time you see a grand piano in a new light – and it changes everything.

The wooden box is turned into a thing of transparent beauty. It doesn’t take up space – it is space. And it creates a place. A place for thought.  PH Pianos website

 

This is how music looks. And what you see is what you hear - the sound is brilliant and crystal clear like the concept of the design itself. If you ever get to play it, that is. Because you can't take your eyes off it.
This is how music looks. And what you see is what you hear – the sound is brilliant and crystal clear like the concept of the design itself. If you ever get to play it, that is. Because you can’t take your eyes off it.

 

 

Our goal is to accurately give credit for all images and information, in the event we fail to do that, please notify us and we will correct the error. LMV

Architects and Their Chairs “G”

Posted by Lynne van den Berg On November 21st

                        “G” is for Gehry

 

Frank-Owen-Gehry

 

 Frank Owen Gehry was born in Toronto, Canada on February 28, 1929. He studied at the University of Southern California and Harvard University. Frank was creative at a young age, building imaginary homes and cities from items found in his grandfather’s hardware store. This interest in unconventional building materials would come to characterize Gehry’s architectural work.  information via, Ruarte Contract

 

      image via, http://ruartecontract.com/frank-gehry-architecture-decoration-materials/

image via  Ruarte Contract

 

Gehry creates unexpected, twisted forms that break conventions of building design. His work has been called radical, playful, organic, and sensual.

His selection of materials such as corrugated metal lends some of Gehry’s designs an unfinished or even crude aesthetic. This consistent approach has made Gehry one of the most distinctive and easily recognizable designers of the recent past. Critics of Gehry’s work have charged, however, that his designs are not thoughtful of contextual concerns and frequently do not make the best use of valuable urban space.

 

My first experience of his work in 2007...love at first sight...University of Iowa

My first experience of his work in 2007…love at first sight…University of Iowa

 

His style has been called Deconstructivist —a post-structuralist aesthetic that challenges accepted design paradigms of architecture while breaking with the modernist ideal of form following function.Frank Gehry looks for an architecture more and more free, with virtuous lines and complex forms, in which the light and its reflection is a principal matter. Furthermore, he is unique in the election of materials, each one more and more unusual giving his works an artistic quality unequaled.   information via, http://www.biography.com/people/frank-gehry-

 

Preliminary sketches for the Panama Puente de Vida Museo | © Frank O. Gehry https://www.foga.com/

Preliminary sketches for the Panama Puente de Vida Museo | © Frank O. Gehry

https://www.foga.com/


“a sculptor that studied architecture”

EMP’s futuristic Frank O. Gehry designed building is constructed of over 21,000 aluminum and stainless steel shingles and 280 steel ribs. If its 400 tons of structural steel were stretched into the lightest banjo string it would extend one-fourth of the way to Venus. Photo courtesy of EMP staff. A world-renowned architect, Frank O. Gehry has been the recipient of numerous awards including the Pritzker Architecture Prize (1989), the Dorothy and Lillian Gish Award (1994), the National Medal of Arts (1998), a Gold Medal from the American Institute of Architects (1999), and the Lifetime Achievement Award from Americans for the Arts (2000). Photo courtesy of EMP staff.

EMP’s futuristic Frank O. Gehry designed building is constructed of over 21,000 aluminum and stainless steel shingles and 280 steel ribs. If its 400 tons of structural steel were stretched into the lightest banjo string it would extend one-fourth of the way to Venus.

A world-renowned architect, Frank O. Gehry has been the recipient of numerous awards including the Pritzker Architecture Prize (1989), the Dorothy and Lillian Gish Award (1994), the National Medal of Arts (1998), a Gold Medal from the American Institute of Architects (1999), and the Lifetime Achievement Award from Americans for the Arts (2000).

Photo courtesy of EMP staff.Situated at the base of the world-renowned Space Needle

 

In His Own Words:

“I approach each building as a sculptural object, a spatial container, a space with light and air, a response to context and appropriateness of feeling and spirit. To this container, this sculpture, the user brings his baggage, his program, and interacts with it to accommodate his needs. If he can’t do that, I’ve failed.”— from the 1980 edition of “Contemporary Architects”

“Building a building is like berthing the Queen Mary in a small slip at a marina. There are lots of wheels and turbines and thousands of people involved, and the architect is the guy at the helm who has to visualize everything going on and organize it all in his head. Architecture is anticipating, working with and understanding all of the craftsmen, what they can do and what they can’t do, and making it all come together. I think of the final product as a dream image, and it’s always elusive. You can have a sense of what the building should look like and you can try to capture it. But you never quite do.”— Conversations With Frank Gehry by Barbara Isenberg, p. 62

information via, http://architecture.about.com/od/greatarchitects/p/gehry.htm

 

EMP Museum – Seattle At the base of the Space Needle, Gehry framed the EMP Museum to look as if its steel-and-aluminum skin is flapping in the wake of Seattle’s famous monorail.
EMP Museum – Seattle
At the base of the Space Needle, Gehry framed the EMP Museum to look as if its steel-and-aluminum skin is flapping in the wake of Seattle’s famous monorail. The building’s remarkable architectural form and sophisticated use of colors and textures can be traced to a melted Stratocaster guitar that served as inspiration to the architect Frank O. Gehry. Architectural Digest

 

 

 Idiosyncratic as it is said to be, Gehry’s philosophy toward designing is simple. He stays original and attempts to balance out the current trends of plain modernism with his own spice. Gehry mirrors the crazy, chaotic, insane aspects of life in his buildings. Like Gehry said himself, “What is architecture? It’s a three-dimensional object, right? So why can’t it be anything?”   www.SilverCreek

 

                                                                                    Furniture

 

EMECO TUYOMYO BENCH DESIGN BY FRANK GEHRY 2009 Emeco with Gehry: A Collaboration in Support of Hereditary Disease Research “Tuyomyo” Yours and Mine: One-of-a-Kind

EMECO TUYOMYO BENCH DESIGN BY FRANK GEHRY 2009
Emeco with Gehry: A Collaboration in Support of Hereditary Disease Research
“Tuyomyo” Yours and Mine: One-of-a-Kind

 

furniture-by-frank-gehry-architect-decor/
furniture-by-frank-gehry-architect-decor/

Gehry had success in the 1970s with his line of Easy Edges chairs made from bent laminated cardboard. By 1991, Gehry was using bent laminated maple to produce the Power Play Armchair. These designs are part of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) collection in NYC.

 

Frank O. Gehry, Easy Edges lounge chair, 1972 www.sfmoma.org

Frank O. Gehry, Easy Edges lounge chair, 1972

www.sfmoma.org

One of the more spectacular 70s chairs is Frank O. Gehry's cardboard chair, Wiggle Side Chair, which is made out of 60 layers of closely compressed ... www.archithings.com

One of the more spectacular 70s chairs is Frank O. Gehry’s cardboard chair, Wiggle Side Chair, which is made out of 60 layers of closely compressed …

www.archithings.com

Frank Gehry Face Off café table and 4 Cross Check arm chairs ...
Frank Gehry Face Off café table and 4 Cross Check arm chairs …

  • The most prominent influence of Gehry’s childhood was the love of fish. The elements he loved in the fish can be constantly seen in all of his buildings. It got him into thinking freely.

“The fish is a perfect form.” –Frank O. Gehry, 1986

 

The shape of the fish is what got me thinking freely. Via silvercreek http://bit.ly/11HXlQU
The shape of the fish is what got me thinking freely. Via silvercreek

 

We always aim to give credit for all images and information, in the event we fail to do that please notify us and we will correct the error. LMV

 

Architects and Their Chairs “F”

Posted by Lynne van den Berg On September 30th

           “F” is for Ferrari-Hardoy

 

The first of the Butterfly chairs came out of the Argentinian architectural firm, Grupo Austral, in 1938. The Austral Group was comprised of Jorge Ferrari-Hardoy, Juan Kurchan and Antoni Bonet (Catalonia), who had met as assistants in Le Corbusier's Paris atelier. The chair is occasionally known as the BKF chair, for Bonet-Kurchan-Ferrari.

Jorge Ferrari-Hardoy and The Butterfly Chair

 

Ferrari-Hardoy is one of the most important architects of Argentina. He belongs to the generation of Argentinean architects that advocated the ideas of modernism.

Ferrari-Hardoy studied until 1937 at the renowned “Escuela de Arquitectura” in Buenos Aires. He then went to Europe and spent a few months in Paris. Inspired by Le Corbusier who – as a representative of the „Congres Internationaux d’Architecture Moderne“ (CIAM) – had a particular interest in Latin America, Ferrari-Hardoy worked closely with him on the elaboration of a first urban master plan for Buenos Aires. In addition, Ferrari-Hardoy was lecturer at the “Escuela Industrial” in La Plata, the “Escuela de Arquitectura y Urbanismo de la Universidad del Litoral” and at the University of Buenos Aires.

 

Edificio Los Eucaliptus / Jorge Ferrari Hardoy + Juan Kurchan

Edificio Los Eucaliptus / Jorge Ferrari Hardoy + Juan Kurchan

 

His Architectural firm, Austral developed pioneering projects, discussed the relevant aspects of contemporary architecture, and participated in exhibitions, competitions and conferences. Moreover, the group members were actively seeking international exposure; they exchanged ideas with architects from other countries and published the magazine “Nosotros”. In addition, Austral organized cultural events and included painters, sculptors, musicians, photographers, doctors, sociologists and educators in their work.

 

 

image via The Modern View - Weinbaum

image via The Modern View – Weinbaum

 

Starting in 1937 the office had been charged with the planning works for a university town on the site of the old port of Buenos Aires, residential buildings in the southern part of the city as well as the construction of hospitals, sports facilities and schools along the central avenue Corrientes. At all their works, Ferrari-Hardoy promoted the use of composable industrial elements and employed curved glass panels and sun visors, as evidenced by the “Ateliers” (1938) at the corner Suipacha and Paraguay. Together with Juan Kurchan he developed from 1941 to 1944 a residential complex in the district of Belgrano. The building became quickly popular because of its implanted tree inside the patio.  The Modern View _ Weinbaum

 

Colorful Marimekko KIVET fabric adorns these cheerful butterflies. Don't you just love the way they stand out against the colors in the landscape? by Jeffrey Gordon Smith Landscape Architecture http://bit.ly/1DDPB0C

Colorful Marimekko KIVET fabric adorns these cheerful butterflies. Don’t you just love the way they stand out against the colors in the landscape?
by Jeffrey Gordon Smith Landscape Architecture http://bit.ly/1DDPB0C

 

 

The BKF chair is a modern update of the Paragon chair which was first made for use as campaign furniture in the 1870s. A later version of the design was known as the Tripolina chair, a portable chair introduced in the early 20th century. Jorge Ferrari Hardoy along with Antonio Bonet and Juan Kurchan developed the BKF in 1938 for an apartment building they designed in Buenos Aires. On July 24, 1940, the chair was shown at the 3rd Salon de Artistas Decoradores exhibition where it was discovered by the Museum of Modern Art. At the request of MoMA design director Edgar Kaufmann Jr., Hardoy sent 3 pre-production chairs to New York. One is in the MoMA collection and one is at the Frank Lloyd Wright house Fallingwater, but no one knows where the third chair went. Naming the BKF as one of the “best efforts of modern chair design,” Kaufmann accurately predicted that it would become extremely popular in the US.  Wikipedia

 

 

black-butterfly-chair black leather buttery Jorge Ferrari-Hardoy butterfly chair from Stella Harasek’s home.
Jorge Ferrari-Hardoy butterfly chair from Stella Harasek’s home. http://bit.ly/1CtxhG1

 

 

Found on houseandhome.com
Found on houseandhome.com

 

 

Bored with the monotony of suburbia? So was Harry Seidler when he arrived from America in 1948.
The potential of the Australian landscape fascinated him, but our boxy homes did not. As a result he embraced a modernist philosophy to create this liveable, functional sculptural home for his parents Rose and Max. However, their Viennese furniture was all but banned from the house by Seidler who favoured features such as open-plan living spaces, minimal colour schemes and built in wardrobes. Thanks to Harry they all made their Australian debuts here.

 

 

The mural at Rose Seidler House (designed by Harry Seidler) sundeck and reproduction Hardoy chairs. Photographer: Justin Mackintosh The Rose Seidler House was designed by Harry Seidler for his parents, Max and Rose, and is located in Wahroonga, on the outskirts of Sydney. Built in the late 1940s, it was his first Australian commission. It is a minimalist, open-plan design with all the modern conveniences of the day. Found on blog.selector.com

The mural at Rose Seidler House (designed by Harry Seidler) sundeck and reproduction Hardoy chairs. Photographer: Justin Mackintosh

The Rose Seidler House was designed by Harry Seidler for his parents, Max and Rose, and is located in Wahroonga, on the outskirts of Sydney. Built in the late 1940s, it was his first Australian commission. It is a minimalist, open-plan design with all the modern conveniences of the day. Found on blog.selector.com

Appreciated by connoisseurs, hipsters and students alike, the butterfly also presaged the disposable-furniture onslaught a half-century later. “It appeared at a moment when there was such a demand for cheap furniture, but furniture that identified with a new aesthetic,” Kinchin says. “You’ve got this burst of color and fun really coming into midcentury modern interiors.” Today MoMA holds a Hardoy in its permanent collection, and Walmart sells one for $39. Somehow it all makes sense.“It’s so minimal,” Dror Benshetrit, designer of the well-regarded Peacock Chair, says of its high-low appeal. “It’s so effortless.”  By HILARY GREENBAUM and DANA RUBINSTEIN  NYTimes Magazine 2012

 

Jorge Ferrari Hardoy-Butterfly 經典蝴蝶椅 W82 x D85 x H96 cm Manufactured by Knoll International of USA, designed by Jorge Ferrari Hardoy, 1938.
Jorge Ferrari Hardoy-Butterfly
經典蝴蝶椅
W82 x D85 x H96 cm
Manufactured by Knoll International of USA,
designed by Jorge Ferrari Hardoy, 1938.

 

An example of some of the chairs other monikers: the B.K.F. Chair, Hardoy Chair, Butterfly Chair, Safari Chair, Sling Chair, or Wing ChairAn estimated 5 million of these chairs were produced during the 1950′s by numerous manufacturers under various names.The tubular steel frame was enamelled and the sling seat was leather. http://bebob.eu/en/designer/hardoy-ferrari/

The B.K.F. chair,  patented in 1877, was originally mass-produced by Artek-Pascoe. In 1945 Knoll took over production and it was a tremendous success. Unlicensed knock-offs and the loss of a Knoll copyright suit have made this one of the most copied chairs of modern design and it became one of the most widely copied chairs in existence. http://bebob.eu/en/designer/hardoy-ferrari/

 

 

Life of and Architect http://www.lifeofanarchitect.com/knoll-hardoy-butterfly-chairs/

Life of and Architect
http://www.lifeofanarchitect.com/knoll-hardoy-butterfly-chairs/

 

 

Found on m.cb2.com 1938 bergama butterfly chair, on the wings of a classic. Bright new angles pop modern in a graphic twist on the 1938 Hardoy Chair, aka the "Butterfly." Envisioned by Brooklyn-based designer Aelfie Oudghiri as a Turkish kilim, the handwoven flatweave dhurrie is inspired by the colorful coastal scene of American beach towns. Aqua, sour apple and white geometric forms radiate bold on a sunny orange backdrop, reflecting the iconic seascape dotted with ice cream shops, hot dog stands and surfers. Hand-whipstitched edge to edge in sour apple on a substantial tubular iron frame antiqued light zinc.

Found on m.cb2.com
1938 bergama butterfly chair
on the wings of a classic. Bright new angles pop modern in a graphic twist on the 1938 Hardoy Chair, aka the “Butterfly.” Envisioned by Brooklyn-based designer Aelfie Oudghiri as a Turkish kilim, the handwoven flatweave dhurrie is inspired by the colorful coastal scene of American beach towns. Aqua, sour apple and white geometric forms radiate bold on a sunny orange backdrop, reflecting the iconic seascape dotted with ice cream shops, hot dog stands and surfers. Hand-whipstitched edge to edge in sour apple on a substantial tubular iron frame antiqued light zinc.

 

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Architects and Their Chairs “E”

Posted by Lynne van den Berg On August 22nd

                        “E” is for Eiermann

Egon Eiermann 1948
Egon Eiermann 1948

Egon Eiermann (September 29, 1904 – July 20, 1970) was one of Germany’s most prominent architects in the second half of the 20th century.

A functionalist, his major works include: the textile mill at Blumberg (1951); the West German pavilion at the Brussels World Exhibition (with Sep Ruf, 1958); the West German embassy in Washington, D.C. (1958–1964); a building for the German Parliament (Bundestag) in Bonn (1965–1969); the IBM-Germany Headquarters in Stuttgart (1967–1972); and, the Olivetti building in Frankfurt (1968–1972). By far his most famous work is the new church on the site of the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church in Berlin (1959–1963). Wikipedia

His wide variety of buildings have been admired for their elegant proportions, precise detail, and structural clarity. Following are a few examples of his architectural point of view.

 

Deutscher Pavillon, Egon Eiermann, 1958 Image via THE-ARQ-M tumblr


Deutscher Pavillon, Egon Eiermann, 1958
Image via THE-ARQ-M tumblr

 

 

Olivetti_Buildings_-_Egon_Eiermann
Olivetti_Buildings_-_Egon_Eiermann

 

 

A staircase detail from an apartment building on Bartningallee 2–4, Wohnhaus, Berlin. Designed by von Egon Eiermann in 1961/1962. / Behance via Tumblr

A staircase detail from an apartment building on Bartningallee 2–4, Wohnhaus, Berlin. Designed by von Egon Eiermann in 1961/1962. / Behance
via Tumblr

 

 

Among the obligatory stops in a visit to Berlin is the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church. Considered a symbol and link between the wartime destruction and the rebirth of the city, it is visited by millions of tourists, even though few remember the name of its architect, Egon Eiermann (1904-70). He was one of the leaders of German modernism who is being rediscovered and celebrated by the Bauhaus. image via http://egoneiermann.tumblr.com/

Among the obligatory stops in a visit to Berlin is the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church. Considered a symbol and link between the wartime destruction and the rebirth of the city, it is visited by millions of tourists, even though few remember the name of its architect, Egon Eiermann (1904-70). He was one of the leaders of German modernism who is being rediscovered and celebrated by the Bauhaus.
image via http://egoneiermann.tumblr.com/

 

                   The Legacy of Chairs

 Egon Eiermann also designed furniture and interiors for some of his buildings.

Eiermann’s most successful furniture design was the “E 10” basket chair (1954), whose prototype was designed back in 1948 for “Wie wohnen”, an exhibition in Karlsruhe. Equally popular was the “SE 18” folding chair Egon Eiermann designed for Wilde & Spieth in Esslingen.

Egon Eiermann is next to Eileen Gray, Mies van der Rohe, Le Corbusier, Arne Jacobsen, Marcel Breuer one of the most famous Bauhaus architects and designers of the Bauhaus era.

 

korbmoeb.300 dpi_BIG-1

 

1949 Egon Eierman Chair Model SE 42

1949 Egon Eierman Chair Model SE 42

 

 

 obiblanche: Davore`s Egon Eiermann collection. My flatmate Davor thought about to buy 2 nice vintage Eiermann chairs for our kitchen, now he has 30 red/orange and 25 black ones. http://egoneiermann.tumblr.com/


obiblanche: Davore`s Egon Eiermann collection.
My flatmate Davor thought about to buy 2 nice vintage Eiermann chairs for our kitchen, now he has 30 red/orange and 25 black ones.
http://egoneiermann.tumblr.com/

 

 

Egon Eiermann folding chairs via http://tootasinfoot.blogspot.com/2012/01/egon-eiermann.html

Egon Eiermann folding chairs via http://tootasinfoot.blogspot.com/2012/01/egon-eiermann.html

 

 

Folding Chair by Egon Eiermann at 1stdibs

Folding Chair by Egon Eiermann at 1stdibs

 

I hope you enjoyed your brief introduction to the work of Egon Eiermann, please leave a comment if you are so inclined. If I have neglected to give accurate credit for any image or quote, please let me know and I will rectify the omission.

Architects and Their Chairs “D”

Posted by Lynne van den Berg On July 14th

         “D” is for Deganello

 

Paolo Deganello via Interiors - Culture dell'Abitare

Paolo Deganello via Interiors – Culture dell’Abitare

“Nowadays, designers have to go against the market, they have to head in an ecologically sustainable direction. They have to be brave enough to bite the hand that feeds them,” Paolo Deganello declares decisively.

Paolo Deganello was born in Este (Padua) in 1940. After graduating with honours from the Faculty of Architecture in Florence in 1966, he opened the studio Arquitectura Radical Archizoom Associati that same year, along with Andrea Branzi, Gilberto Corretti and Massimo Morozzi. He worked at the studio until it disbanded in 1972. He then began freelancing in Milan, which he still does today, combining his architectural and design projects with teaching positions. Since 2006, he teaches at ESAD in Matosiñho (Oporto) and since 2008 at the Architecture Faculty in Alghero (Italy).
His work is featured in the collections of the Victoria and Albert Museum and the Design Museum (London), the Museum of Modern Art (Toyama, Japan), the Denver Museum (Denver, USA), the Vitra Design Museum (Weil am Rhein, Germany), the Museo do Design of the Cultural Centre of Belem (Lisbon) and the Museo del Design della Triennale in Milan.  via  experimenta magazine

 

  A pair of "Torso" high back sculptural chairs redone in silver Pewter leather designed by Paolo Deganello for Cassina in 1982. Visually interesting and comfortable.


A pair of “Torso” high back sculptural chairs redone in silver Pewter leather designed by Paolo Deganello for Cassina in 1982. Visually interesting and comfortable.

 

 

Paolo Deganello, Regina chairs for Zanotta Italy 1991 Designer: Paolo Deganello Provenance: Italy Material: Leather & Cowskin

Paolo Deganello Regina chairs for Zanotta Italy 1991
Designer: Paolo Deganello
Provenance: Italy
Material: Leather & Cowskin

 

 

mies’ chaise longue, 1969. design archizoom .manufactured by poltronova. courtesy paolo deganello

mies’ chaise longue, 1969.
design archizoom .manufactured by poltronova.
courtesy paolo deganello

 

 

Playful 80's Italian sofa with serious style. Seat in leather and back upholstered in a specially-commissioned Jack Lenor Larsen material entitled "La Madre" ("The Mother"). From Deganello's "Torso" series for Cassina. 1stdibs


Playful 80’s Italian sofa with serious style. Seat in leather and back upholstered in a specially-commissioned Jack Lenor Larsen material entitled “La Madre” (“The Mother”). From Deganello’s “Torso” series for Cassina. 1stdibs

 

                                                   AEO 1973

“When Paolo Deganello, cofounder of the Archizoom group from Florence, Italy, presented the “AEO” chair in 1973, it attracted great attention. The chair is undeniably comfortable, but opinions differ on its unusual appearance. One side regards it as a caricature of the robust television chair, the other as an icon of a new functional aesthetic.   Deganello does not comply with a particular aesthetic convention but instead sets the different qualities off against each other.”  Vitra Design Museum

 

Vitra Design Museum Design: 1973 Production: 1973 to the present Manufacturer: Cassina

Vitra Design Museum
Design: 1973
Production: 1973 to the present
Manufacturer: Cassina

 

 “We need to turn design inside out, like a glove”

Paolo Deganello  06/30/2010

Based on his participation in the seminar Less is Next held on World Food Day, Paolo Deganello uses the crisis as a starting point to reflect upon the kind of role architects and designers should play in organising a fairer professional practice, rooted in the defence of new, ethical values.

He goes on to say, “now that we are faced with economic crisis and the ever more dramatic destruction of the planet’s resources. My proposal, which I had already been advocating for some years, was that we must change all our schools of design into schools of socially responsible and/or sustainable design.”

from Experimenta Magazine Spain

learn more from Paolo Deganello, watch the video My Radical Project Architecture and Eco Design

Architects and Their Chairs “C”

Posted by Lynne van den Berg On June 10th

        C is for Castiglioni

 

 

 “Start from scratch. Stick to common sense. Know your goals and means”.

Achille Castiglioni (February 26, 1918 – December 2, 2002) was a renowned Italian industrial designer. He was often inspired by everyday things and made use of ordinary materials.He preferred to use a minimal amount of materials to create forms with maximal effect.

Achille Castiglioni was born in Milan and studied architecture at the Politecnico di Milano University and set up a design office in 1944 with his brothers, Livioioni Castiglioni and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni. In 1956, Castiglioni founded the Associazione per il Disegno Industriale (Association for Industrial Design, ADI). Castiglioni taught for many years, first at the Politecnico di Torino, and in 1969 he led a class in Industrial Design at the Politecnico di Milano.

MoMA’s permanent collection in New York hosts 14 of his works. Other works may be found in the following museums: Victoria and Albert Museum in London, Kunstgewerbe Museum in Zurich, Staatliches Museum für Angewandte Kunst in Munich, Design Museum in Prato, Uneleckoprumyslove Museum in Prague, Israel Museum in Jerusalem, The Denver Art Museum, Vitra Design Museum in Weil am Rhein, Angewandte Kunst Museum in Hamburg and Koln

 

 

 

Sanluca, designed in 1960 by Achille and Pier Giacomo, is a modern take on the traditional lounge chair - See more at: http://www.italymagazine.com/featured-story/three-best-italian-lounge-chairs#sthash.wLMLWGNv.dpuf

Sanluca, designed in 1960 by Achille and Pier Giacomo, is a modern take on the traditional lounge chair – See more at: http://www.italymagazine.com/featured-story/three-best-italian-lounge-chairs

 

 

Achille Castiglioni . sancarlo, for Tacchini http://www.tacchini.it/

Achille Castiglioni . sancarlo, for Tacchini
http://www.tacchini.it/

 

 

Achille Castiglioni, Sella telephone stool, 1957, for Zanotta (designed with Pier Giacomo Castiglioni).

Achille Castiglioni, Sella telephone stool, 1957, for Zanotta (designed with Pier Giacomo Castiglioni).

 

 

1980's 'vintage' Leonardo table, Achille Castiglioni Architectural trestle work table Pin by Ryan Tam on Tables | Pinterest

1980’s ‘vintage’ Leonardo table, Achille Castiglioni Architectural trestle work table
Pin by Ryan Tam on Tables | Pinterest

 

 

the achille castiglioni effect www.designboom.com

the achille castiglioni effect
www.designboom.com

 

 

The famous Arco Floor Lamp with its elegant marble base was designed in 1962 by Achille Castiglioni and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni for the Italian manufacturer Flos.

The famous Arco Floor Lamp with its elegant marble base was designed in 1962 by Achille Castiglioni and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni for the Italian manufacturer Flos.

 

 

Design is one of the highest expressions of twentieth-century creativity, and Achille Castiglioni is one of its greatest masters. His objects stand as clear examples of rigorous method, technical skill, exuberant talent, and wit, combined to achieve a beauty that is fulfilling on both a rational and an emotional level. His work exemplifies the ideal of good design.

With his functional and purist yet playful objects, Castiglioni has shown that form and function, while certainly the main ingredients for successful design, cannot be a designer’s only concerns. He has thus contributed invaluably to updating modernist design to contemporary modern.

Paola Antonelli
Associate Curator
Department of Architecture and Design

Excerpt from MOMA exhibition

 

Overview of all products by designer Achille Castiglioni

 

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