Mid-Century Modern Furniture Then and Now - Paradigm Gallery Blog

Archive for the ‘Interior Design’ Category

Architects and Their Chairs “E”

Posted by Lynne van den Berg On August 22nd

                        “E” is for Eiermann

Egon Eiermann 1948
Egon Eiermann 1948

Egon Eiermann (September 29, 1904 – July 20, 1970) was one of Germany’s most prominent architects in the second half of the 20th century.

A functionalist, his major works include: the textile mill at Blumberg (1951); the West German pavilion at the Brussels World Exhibition (with Sep Ruf, 1958); the West German embassy in Washington, D.C. (1958–1964); a building for the German Parliament (Bundestag) in Bonn (1965–1969); the IBM-Germany Headquarters in Stuttgart (1967–1972); and, the Olivetti building in Frankfurt (1968–1972). By far his most famous work is the new church on the site of the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church in Berlin (1959–1963). Wikipedia

His wide variety of buildings have been admired for their elegant proportions, precise detail, and structural clarity. Following are a few examples of his architectural point of view.

 

Deutscher Pavillon, Egon Eiermann, 1958 Image via THE-ARQ-M tumblr


Deutscher Pavillon, Egon Eiermann, 1958
Image via THE-ARQ-M tumblr

 

 

Olivetti_Buildings_-_Egon_Eiermann
Olivetti_Buildings_-_Egon_Eiermann

 

 

A staircase detail from an apartment building on Bartningallee 2–4, Wohnhaus, Berlin. Designed by von Egon Eiermann in 1961/1962. / Behance via Tumblr

A staircase detail from an apartment building on Bartningallee 2–4, Wohnhaus, Berlin. Designed by von Egon Eiermann in 1961/1962. / Behance
via Tumblr

 

 

Among the obligatory stops in a visit to Berlin is the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church. Considered a symbol and link between the wartime destruction and the rebirth of the city, it is visited by millions of tourists, even though few remember the name of its architect, Egon Eiermann (1904-70). He was one of the leaders of German modernism who is being rediscovered and celebrated by the Bauhaus. image via http://egoneiermann.tumblr.com/

Among the obligatory stops in a visit to Berlin is the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church. Considered a symbol and link between the wartime destruction and the rebirth of the city, it is visited by millions of tourists, even though few remember the name of its architect, Egon Eiermann (1904-70). He was one of the leaders of German modernism who is being rediscovered and celebrated by the Bauhaus.
image via http://egoneiermann.tumblr.com/

 

                   The Legacy of Chairs

 Egon Eiermann also designed furniture and interiors for some of his buildings.

Eiermann’s most successful furniture design was the “E 10” basket chair (1954), whose prototype was designed back in 1948 for “Wie wohnen”, an exhibition in Karlsruhe. Equally popular was the “SE 18” folding chair Egon Eiermann designed for Wilde & Spieth in Esslingen.

Egon Eiermann is next to Eileen Gray, Mies van der Rohe, Le Corbusier, Arne Jacobsen, Marcel Breuer one of the most famous Bauhaus architects and designers of the Bauhaus era.

 

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1949 Egon Eierman Chair Model SE 42

1949 Egon Eierman Chair Model SE 42

 

 

 obiblanche: Davore`s Egon Eiermann collection. My flatmate Davor thought about to buy 2 nice vintage Eiermann chairs for our kitchen, now he has 30 red/orange and 25 black ones. http://egoneiermann.tumblr.com/


obiblanche: Davore`s Egon Eiermann collection.
My flatmate Davor thought about to buy 2 nice vintage Eiermann chairs for our kitchen, now he has 30 red/orange and 25 black ones.
http://egoneiermann.tumblr.com/

 

 

Egon Eiermann folding chairs via http://tootasinfoot.blogspot.com/2012/01/egon-eiermann.html

Egon Eiermann folding chairs via http://tootasinfoot.blogspot.com/2012/01/egon-eiermann.html

 

 

Folding Chair by Egon Eiermann at 1stdibs

Folding Chair by Egon Eiermann at 1stdibs

 

I hope you enjoyed your brief introduction to the work of Egon Eiermann, please leave a comment if you are so inclined. If I have neglected to give accurate credit for any image or quote, please let me know and I will rectify the omission.

Architects and Their Chairs “C”

Posted by Lynne van den Berg On June 10th

        C is for Castiglioni

 

 

 “Start from scratch. Stick to common sense. Know your goals and means”.

Achille Castiglioni (February 26, 1918 – December 2, 2002) was a renowned Italian industrial designer. He was often inspired by everyday things and made use of ordinary materials.He preferred to use a minimal amount of materials to create forms with maximal effect.

Achille Castiglioni was born in Milan and studied architecture at the Politecnico di Milano University and set up a design office in 1944 with his brothers, Livioioni Castiglioni and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni. In 1956, Castiglioni founded the Associazione per il Disegno Industriale (Association for Industrial Design, ADI). Castiglioni taught for many years, first at the Politecnico di Torino, and in 1969 he led a class in Industrial Design at the Politecnico di Milano.

MoMA’s permanent collection in New York hosts 14 of his works. Other works may be found in the following museums: Victoria and Albert Museum in London, Kunstgewerbe Museum in Zurich, Staatliches Museum für Angewandte Kunst in Munich, Design Museum in Prato, Uneleckoprumyslove Museum in Prague, Israel Museum in Jerusalem, The Denver Art Museum, Vitra Design Museum in Weil am Rhein, Angewandte Kunst Museum in Hamburg and Koln

 

 

 

Sanluca, designed in 1960 by Achille and Pier Giacomo, is a modern take on the traditional lounge chair - See more at: http://www.italymagazine.com/featured-story/three-best-italian-lounge-chairs#sthash.wLMLWGNv.dpuf

Sanluca, designed in 1960 by Achille and Pier Giacomo, is a modern take on the traditional lounge chair – See more at: http://www.italymagazine.com/featured-story/three-best-italian-lounge-chairs

 

 

Achille Castiglioni . sancarlo, for Tacchini http://www.tacchini.it/

Achille Castiglioni . sancarlo, for Tacchini
http://www.tacchini.it/

 

 

Achille Castiglioni, Sella telephone stool, 1957, for Zanotta (designed with Pier Giacomo Castiglioni).

Achille Castiglioni, Sella telephone stool, 1957, for Zanotta (designed with Pier Giacomo Castiglioni).

 

 

1980's 'vintage' Leonardo table, Achille Castiglioni Architectural trestle work table Pin by Ryan Tam on Tables | Pinterest

1980’s ‘vintage’ Leonardo table, Achille Castiglioni Architectural trestle work table
Pin by Ryan Tam on Tables | Pinterest

 

 

the achille castiglioni effect www.designboom.com

the achille castiglioni effect
www.designboom.com

 

 

The famous Arco Floor Lamp with its elegant marble base was designed in 1962 by Achille Castiglioni and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni for the Italian manufacturer Flos.

The famous Arco Floor Lamp with its elegant marble base was designed in 1962 by Achille Castiglioni and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni for the Italian manufacturer Flos.

 

 

Design is one of the highest expressions of twentieth-century creativity, and Achille Castiglioni is one of its greatest masters. His objects stand as clear examples of rigorous method, technical skill, exuberant talent, and wit, combined to achieve a beauty that is fulfilling on both a rational and an emotional level. His work exemplifies the ideal of good design.

With his functional and purist yet playful objects, Castiglioni has shown that form and function, while certainly the main ingredients for successful design, cannot be a designer’s only concerns. He has thus contributed invaluably to updating modernist design to contemporary modern.

Paola Antonelli
Associate Curator
Department of Architecture and Design

Excerpt from MOMA exhibition

 

Overview of all products by designer Achille Castiglioni

 

We apologize if we have failed to credit a quote or an image to the correct source. Please let us know and we will correct the error.

 

Architects and Their Chairs “A”

Posted by Lynne van den Berg On April 14th

          A is for Aulenti

Gae Aulenti 1927-1912

Gae Aulenti 1927-1912

We begin this retrospective with Gae Aulenti (December 4, 1927 – October 31, 2012) an Italian architect, lighting and interior designer, and industrial designer. She was well known for several large-scale museum projects, including Musée d’Orsay in Paris (1980–86), the Contemporary Art Gallery at the Centre Pompidou in Paris, Palazzo Grassi in Venice (1985–86), and the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco (2000–2003). Information via Wikipedia

Quote: “advice to whoever asks me how to make a home is to not have anything, just a few shelves for books, some pillows to sit on. And then, to take a stand against the ephemeral, against passing trends…and to return to lasting values.”

 

                        Sparsal Rocking Chair 1962

Gae Aulenti Italian Architect , Industrial Designer Sparsul Rocking Chair 1962

Gae Aulenti Italian Architect , Industrial Designer
Sparsul Rocking Chair 1962

 

 

 

Gae Aulenti Italian Architect and Industrial Designer Tostapane

Gae Aulenti Italian Architect and Industrial Designer
Tostapane

 

 

tavolo con ruote

tavolo con ruote

 

 

Tour Table by Gae Aulenti Available through: www.mintshop.co.uk Pic: www.moggit.com


Tour Table by Gae Aulenti
Available through: www.mintshop.co.uk
Pic: www.moggit.com

 

Architect and Industrial Designer at Home Gae Aulenti

Architect and Industrial Designer at Home
Gae Aulenti

 

 

Architect and Industrial Designer at Home Gae Aulenti

Architect and Industrial Designer at Home
Gae Aulenti

 

Ms. Aulenti was one of the few Italian women to rise to prominence in architecture and design in the postwar years. Her work includes villas for the rich, showrooms for Fiat, shops for Olivetti, pens and watches for Louis Vuitton, and a coffee table on wheels that is in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

“I’ve always worked for myself, and it’s been quite an education. Women in architecture must not think of themselves as a minority, because the minute you do, you become paralyzed. It is most important to never create the problem.” Gae Aulenti

 

Mid-Century Modern Lighting for Every Style

Posted by Charu Gureja On January 23rd

We welcome our friend and guest blogger, Charu Gureja. “I’m an interior designer, passionate about interior spaces, architecture, furniture, lighting and art. Generally speaking, I enjoy anything and everything related to art and design! Growing up in countries like Egypt, Japan, Sri Lanka, India and Singapore, I’ve come to appreciate a wide variety of design principles.”  Pocket Full of Design . Charu brings to us her global point of view and her specific interest in modern lighting.

 

Like other elements of Mid-century Modern design, lighting fulfills both the aesthetic and functional needs of a space while eliminating the need for extraneous decoration. The fixtures have simple yet sculptural forms, which make them versatile enough to fit into spaces of any style, be it traditional, industrial, eclectic or contemporary.

Through the following examples I hope to inspire you to create your own unique look using Mid-century Modern lighting. The Paradigm Gallery website and blog are a great resource in terms of inspiration and products to help you along and I’m thankful to them for inviting me to share my thoughts here!

 

Read the rest of this entry »

Cheers and Chairs 2014!

Posted by Lynne van den Berg On December 31st

Paradigm Gallery is proud to offer products from several new partners. While we are restyling our website we have not shown the full  array of our new modern furniture options, but they will be coming soon. The new year, 2014, is an important beginning for Paradigm Gallery’s emphasis on modern designs manufactured in the USA and Europe. The emphasis is on environmental awareness in sourcing the materials and quality furniture.

 

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The Osaka Chair

 

 

Lounge22 retail furniture and rental furniture is hand crafted in Los Angeles, California. Lounge22′s product is designed and fabricated with the highest level  of integrity.

Osaka Chair:  The Osaka makes use of future-forward technology to literally bend matter; in this case, sustainable bamboo. This beauty’s smart design and unequaled craftsmanship make it a timeless addition to any room. A signature addition to our collection, the Osaka Chair is part of Lounge22′s Green Line. Made from sustainable bamboo.

 

 

 

 

 

B&T       B&T B&T

The Nuans Collection is very young, utterly attractive modern furniture collection.Commercial grade, minimally designed, very unique furniture line. Nuans Collection specializes in hospitality seating in general and dining chairs in particular. The entire line is manufactured under one roof in our factory in Turkey, following European specifications.

B & T Design the words better, desirable, and worthy of choice lie at the heart of the brand

 Kubicoff artgallery

With use of modern materials Kubikoff Italy was able to reinterpret authentic icons of design. In this restyling, they collaborated with brilliant young architects, such as Sander Mulder, Ruud Bos, Jutta Friedrichs and the Stolt Design group.

The Kubikoff project is the result of international spirit and Italian labor. The winning commercial idea is to release immediately recognizable products at an accessible price. Today, Kubikoff manages to be one of the most attractive European design firm. Kubikoff is manufacturing tomorrow’s classics.

KubikoffLab

 

 

 

Zifg Zag Armchair Designer: Shell: Kubikoff lab / Base: Jutta Friedrichs

Zifg Zag Armchair Designer: Shell: Kubikoff lab / Base: Jutta Friedrichs

 

 

 

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Diamond Patchwork Rock

 

 

 

 Made In Detroit  Möbel Link

 At Möbel Link, the passion for design is matched only by an unflagging commitment to operate in a manner that preserves and protects the earth’s resources. All Möbel Link furniture is made from sustainably grown and harvested, formaldehyde-free, multi-veneer Baltic birch plywood. The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) has certified the plywood used in Möbel Link furniture as environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial and economically viable for  management of the world’s forests

Founder Alan Kaniarz is known around Detroit as a brilliant craftsperson and an innovator in the world of furniture design. Alan’s furniture can be seen at the Detroit Institute of Arts in the Modern wing. He was also recently chosen to re-create furniture for the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Turkel-Benbow House in Detroit.

 

 

The ZagZig chair responds to your movements. Handcrafted in Detroit, and made from sustainably grown and harvested plywood

The ZagZig chair responds to your movements. Handcrafted in Detroit, and made from sustainably grown and harvested plywood

 

 

 

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Made in Detroit: Impeccable Craftsmenship

Made in Detroit the new modern look of American Furniture

Paradigm Gallery wishes all of our readers a New Year of Peace, and good health….cheers!

 

Gotham Lounge Chair from J Persing made in Pennsylvania

Gotham Lounge Chair from J Persing made in Pennsylvania

Imperfection: A Look At Wabi Sabi

Posted by Lynne van den Berg On November 1st

 

blaxsand.com

blaxsand.com

 

  “Instinctively I was drawn to the beauty of things coarse and unrefined; things rich in raw texture and rough tactility. Often these things are reactive to the effects of weathering and human treatment.

And lastly, I was attracted to the beauty of things simple, but not ostentatiously austere. Things clean and unencumbered, but not sterilized. Materiality, pared down to essence, with the poetry intact.”  Leonard Koren   http://bit.ly/1dtfdzh

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thursday’s child: wabi sabi

wabi sabi is flea market finds, not michigan ave purchases. it celebrates cracks and crevices and all the other marks that time, weather, and loving use leave behind. it reminds us that we are all transient beings, that our bodies as well as the material world around us are fleeting. through wabi-sabi, we learn to embrace wrinkles and rust, grey hairs and frayed edges and the march of time they represent. it’s a fragmentary glimpse of the part, not the whole, the journey not the destination.

http://bit.ly/1bu20Z0    The Space Between Ms. and Mrs.  A Blog Post

 

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Wabi

Wabi means things that are fresh and simple. It denotes simplicity and quietude, and also incorporates rustic beauty. It includes both that which is made by nature, and that which is made by man. It also can mean an accidental or happenstance element (or perhaps even a small flaw) which gives elegance and uniqueness to the whole, such as the pattern made by a flowing glaze on a ceramic object.

Sabi

Sabi means things whose beauty stems from age. It refers to the patina of age, and the concept that changes due to use may make an object more beautiful and valuable. This also incorporates an appreciation of the cycles of life, as well as careful, artful mending of damage.

– “The Classic Tradition In Japanese Architecture: Modern Versions Of The Sukiya Style”, Teiji Itoh, Yukio Futagawa

Wabi-sabi is a beauty of things imperfect, impermanent, and incomplete. It is a beauty of things modest and humble. It is a beauty of things unconventional. … The closest English word to wabi-sabi is probably “rustic”. … Things wabi-sabi are unstudied and inevitable looking. .. unpretentious. .. Their craftsmanship may be impossible to discern. “

onlybutaglimpsetumblr.com

onlybutaglimpsetumblr.com

 

If we have not included appropriate information about any text or images please notify us and we will correct it.

Toyo Ito 2013’s Pritzker Prize Recipient

Posted by Lynne van den Berg On September 4th
This month we have a guest, Charu Gureja, from the blog, Pocket Full of Design.
Charu worked as an interior designer, and lighting designer for several years in Singapore, and now lives in San Francisco.  She is passionate about interior spaces, architecture, furniture, lighting and art. Her unique point of view has evolved through her years spent in countries such as Egypt, Japan, Sri Lanka, India and Singapore.

01, April 2013
“I’m thrilled to dedicate this post to Toyo Ito who recently received the Pritzker Prize for his architectural contributions spanning four decades! For those of you who are unfamiliar with the award, it’s basically the Nobel Prize for the field of architecture :-) .

I could hardly curb my enthusiasm when I heard of this announcement as Toyo Ito’s works were a source of great inspiration to me as a design student. His pursuit of beauty through simple and timeless designs still inspires me and I strive to achieve that in my own work. His works range from designing cups and saucers, mobile dog homes to multi story buildings!

So without further ado, here are some of my favorite Toyo Ito designs:

 

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Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2002 in London, UK [via archdaily]:

 

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Mobile Home for Shiba [via Architecture for Dogs] – Do check out the adorable video on how this home was created on the website!

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Ripples Bench for Horm (created using 5 layers of these solid woods: Walnut, mahogany, cherry, oak and ash):

 

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What do you guys think of his work? Has he rightly earned his place in the Pritzker hall of fame along with I.M. Pei, Richard Meier, Frank Gehry, Tadao Ando and the likes?”

Please visit Charu Gureja at Pocket Full of Designs where she discusses topics such as interior design, lighting, and architecture.

 

 

InteriorDesign: Embracing an Eclectic Style

Posted by Lynne van den Berg On August 12th
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parishotelboutique.
blogspot.com

Sometimes it takes a leap of faith to “mix it up” when decorating a space. An eclectic approach, or mixing it up refers  to combining seemingly disparate styles of furniture and accessories. That could include: an industrial coffee table, a Scandinavian style sofa, a mid century classic lounge chair, a vintage lighting fixture,  perhaps  an antique gilded mirror or Victorian footstool. The point is, there are many styles that play well together. Ultimately, success is achieved by blending and balancing  the elements in a way that each distinct piece is an important part of the whole, a composition of varying personalities if you will. I have always approached decorating with the philosophy that I need to have a connection to the things that I live with. The item needs to be beautiful to me, not just a functional piece. I don’t adhere to a singular era or style.

Having said all of this, I will now add some of the fine tuning details for creating your signature environment. Leonardo da Vinci is credited with the quote, “simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” As I have developed and honed my philosophy on decor, it has gradually grown into a simpatico with the Miesian theory of “less is more”.  I need my spaces to breathe and allow for the individual elements to shine and be seen. If you overcrowd a room with furniture or accessories it creates a heavier space with a cluttered vibe and the individual beauty of each item gets lost in the confusion.  Nothing weighs a room down more quickly then loading every flat surface with “things”.  Someone visiting my home once said, “in every direction I turn there is a thoughtful, creative, view”, and he was not speaking about gazing through the windows.

The last few things to consider are the horizontal and vertical spaces, or simply said, the walls, floor, and ceiling. They have the potential to help create your room palette, add texture, and either calm or invigorate the energy. You can stay monochromatic in the decor or not, and use large art for color, multiple photos, posters, collections of tarnished silver trays or mirrors, whatever works for you. The most important thing to remember is to always edit your work.  Keep in mind that it is a dynamic expression of you. It is changeable and adaptable to change.  Think of the room as a visual  expression of your autobiography.

 

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image via mixandchic.com

 

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image shared via thecuratedhouse.com

 

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housetohome.co.uk

 

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image via niceity.livejournal.com