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Architects and Their Chairs “F”

Posted by Lynne van den Berg On September 30th

           “F” is for Ferrari-Hardoy

 

The first of the Butterfly chairs came out of the Argentinian architectural firm, Grupo Austral, in 1938. The Austral Group was comprised of Jorge Ferrari-Hardoy, Juan Kurchan and Antoni Bonet (Catalonia), who had met as assistants in Le Corbusier's Paris atelier. The chair is occasionally known as the BKF chair, for Bonet-Kurchan-Ferrari.

Jorge Ferrari-Hardoy and The Butterfly Chair

 

Ferrari-Hardoy is one of the most important architects of Argentina. He belongs to the generation of Argentinean architects that advocated the ideas of modernism.

Ferrari-Hardoy studied until 1937 at the renowned “Escuela de Arquitectura” in Buenos Aires. He then went to Europe and spent a few months in Paris. Inspired by Le Corbusier who – as a representative of the „Congres Internationaux d’Architecture Moderne“ (CIAM) – had a particular interest in Latin America, Ferrari-Hardoy worked closely with him on the elaboration of a first urban master plan for Buenos Aires. In addition, Ferrari-Hardoy was lecturer at the “Escuela Industrial” in La Plata, the “Escuela de Arquitectura y Urbanismo de la Universidad del Litoral” and at the University of Buenos Aires.

 

Edificio Los Eucaliptus / Jorge Ferrari Hardoy + Juan Kurchan

Edificio Los Eucaliptus / Jorge Ferrari Hardoy + Juan Kurchan

 

His Architectural firm, Austral developed pioneering projects, discussed the relevant aspects of contemporary architecture, and participated in exhibitions, competitions and conferences. Moreover, the group members were actively seeking international exposure; they exchanged ideas with architects from other countries and published the magazine “Nosotros”. In addition, Austral organized cultural events and included painters, sculptors, musicians, photographers, doctors, sociologists and educators in their work.

 

 

image via The Modern View - Weinbaum

image via The Modern View – Weinbaum

 

Starting in 1937 the office had been charged with the planning works for a university town on the site of the old port of Buenos Aires, residential buildings in the southern part of the city as well as the construction of hospitals, sports facilities and schools along the central avenue Corrientes. At all their works, Ferrari-Hardoy promoted the use of composable industrial elements and employed curved glass panels and sun visors, as evidenced by the “Ateliers” (1938) at the corner Suipacha and Paraguay. Together with Juan Kurchan he developed from 1941 to 1944 a residential complex in the district of Belgrano. The building became quickly popular because of its implanted tree inside the patio.  The Modern View _ Weinbaum

 

Colorful Marimekko KIVET fabric adorns these cheerful butterflies. Don't you just love the way they stand out against the colors in the landscape? by Jeffrey Gordon Smith Landscape Architecture http://bit.ly/1DDPB0C

Colorful Marimekko KIVET fabric adorns these cheerful butterflies. Don’t you just love the way they stand out against the colors in the landscape?
by Jeffrey Gordon Smith Landscape Architecture http://bit.ly/1DDPB0C

 

 

The BKF chair is a modern update of the Paragon chair which was first made for use as campaign furniture in the 1870s. A later version of the design was known as the Tripolina chair, a portable chair introduced in the early 20th century. Jorge Ferrari Hardoy along with Antonio Bonet and Juan Kurchan developed the BKF in 1938 for an apartment building they designed in Buenos Aires. On July 24, 1940, the chair was shown at the 3rd Salon de Artistas Decoradores exhibition where it was discovered by the Museum of Modern Art. At the request of MoMA design director Edgar Kaufmann Jr., Hardoy sent 3 pre-production chairs to New York. One is in the MoMA collection and one is at the Frank Lloyd Wright house Fallingwater, but no one knows where the third chair went. Naming the BKF as one of the “best efforts of modern chair design,” Kaufmann accurately predicted that it would become extremely popular in the US.  Wikipedia

 

 

black-butterfly-chair black leather buttery Jorge Ferrari-Hardoy butterfly chair from Stella Harasek’s home.
Jorge Ferrari-Hardoy butterfly chair from Stella Harasek’s home. http://bit.ly/1CtxhG1

 

 

Found on houseandhome.com
Found on houseandhome.com

 

 

Bored with the monotony of suburbia? So was Harry Seidler when he arrived from America in 1948.
The potential of the Australian landscape fascinated him, but our boxy homes did not. As a result he embraced a modernist philosophy to create this liveable, functional sculptural home for his parents Rose and Max. However, their Viennese furniture was all but banned from the house by Seidler who favoured features such as open-plan living spaces, minimal colour schemes and built in wardrobes. Thanks to Harry they all made their Australian debuts here.

 

 

The mural at Rose Seidler House (designed by Harry Seidler) sundeck and reproduction Hardoy chairs. Photographer: Justin Mackintosh The Rose Seidler House was designed by Harry Seidler for his parents, Max and Rose, and is located in Wahroonga, on the outskirts of Sydney. Built in the late 1940s, it was his first Australian commission. It is a minimalist, open-plan design with all the modern conveniences of the day. Found on blog.selector.com

The mural at Rose Seidler House (designed by Harry Seidler) sundeck and reproduction Hardoy chairs. Photographer: Justin Mackintosh

The Rose Seidler House was designed by Harry Seidler for his parents, Max and Rose, and is located in Wahroonga, on the outskirts of Sydney. Built in the late 1940s, it was his first Australian commission. It is a minimalist, open-plan design with all the modern conveniences of the day. Found on blog.selector.com

Appreciated by connoisseurs, hipsters and students alike, the butterfly also presaged the disposable-furniture onslaught a half-century later. “It appeared at a moment when there was such a demand for cheap furniture, but furniture that identified with a new aesthetic,” Kinchin says. “You’ve got this burst of color and fun really coming into midcentury modern interiors.” Today MoMA holds a Hardoy in its permanent collection, and Walmart sells one for $39. Somehow it all makes sense.“It’s so minimal,” Dror Benshetrit, designer of the well-regarded Peacock Chair, says of its high-low appeal. “It’s so effortless.”  By HILARY GREENBAUM and DANA RUBINSTEIN  NYTimes Magazine 2012

 

Jorge Ferrari Hardoy-Butterfly 經典蝴蝶椅 W82 x D85 x H96 cm Manufactured by Knoll International of USA, designed by Jorge Ferrari Hardoy, 1938.
Jorge Ferrari Hardoy-Butterfly
經典蝴蝶椅
W82 x D85 x H96 cm
Manufactured by Knoll International of USA,
designed by Jorge Ferrari Hardoy, 1938.

 

An example of some of the chairs other monikers: the B.K.F. Chair, Hardoy Chair, Butterfly Chair, Safari Chair, Sling Chair, or Wing ChairAn estimated 5 million of these chairs were produced during the 1950′s by numerous manufacturers under various names.The tubular steel frame was enamelled and the sling seat was leather. http://bebob.eu/en/designer/hardoy-ferrari/

The B.K.F. chair,  patented in 1877, was originally mass-produced by Artek-Pascoe. In 1945 Knoll took over production and it was a tremendous success. Unlicensed knock-offs and the loss of a Knoll copyright suit have made this one of the most copied chairs of modern design and it became one of the most widely copied chairs in existence. http://bebob.eu/en/designer/hardoy-ferrari/

 

 

Life of and Architect http://www.lifeofanarchitect.com/knoll-hardoy-butterfly-chairs/

Life of and Architect
http://www.lifeofanarchitect.com/knoll-hardoy-butterfly-chairs/

 

 

Found on m.cb2.com 1938 bergama butterfly chair, on the wings of a classic. Bright new angles pop modern in a graphic twist on the 1938 Hardoy Chair, aka the "Butterfly." Envisioned by Brooklyn-based designer Aelfie Oudghiri as a Turkish kilim, the handwoven flatweave dhurrie is inspired by the colorful coastal scene of American beach towns. Aqua, sour apple and white geometric forms radiate bold on a sunny orange backdrop, reflecting the iconic seascape dotted with ice cream shops, hot dog stands and surfers. Hand-whipstitched edge to edge in sour apple on a substantial tubular iron frame antiqued light zinc.

Found on m.cb2.com
1938 bergama butterfly chair
on the wings of a classic. Bright new angles pop modern in a graphic twist on the 1938 Hardoy Chair, aka the “Butterfly.” Envisioned by Brooklyn-based designer Aelfie Oudghiri as a Turkish kilim, the handwoven flatweave dhurrie is inspired by the colorful coastal scene of American beach towns. Aqua, sour apple and white geometric forms radiate bold on a sunny orange backdrop, reflecting the iconic seascape dotted with ice cream shops, hot dog stands and surfers. Hand-whipstitched edge to edge in sour apple on a substantial tubular iron frame antiqued light zinc.

 

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Architects and Their Chairs “D”

Posted by Lynne van den Berg On July 14th

         “D” is for Deganello

 

Paolo Deganello via Interiors - Culture dell'Abitare

Paolo Deganello via Interiors – Culture dell’Abitare

“Nowadays, designers have to go against the market, they have to head in an ecologically sustainable direction. They have to be brave enough to bite the hand that feeds them,” Paolo Deganello declares decisively.

Paolo Deganello was born in Este (Padua) in 1940. After graduating with honours from the Faculty of Architecture in Florence in 1966, he opened the studio Arquitectura Radical Archizoom Associati that same year, along with Andrea Branzi, Gilberto Corretti and Massimo Morozzi. He worked at the studio until it disbanded in 1972. He then began freelancing in Milan, which he still does today, combining his architectural and design projects with teaching positions. Since 2006, he teaches at ESAD in Matosiñho (Oporto) and since 2008 at the Architecture Faculty in Alghero (Italy).
His work is featured in the collections of the Victoria and Albert Museum and the Design Museum (London), the Museum of Modern Art (Toyama, Japan), the Denver Museum (Denver, USA), the Vitra Design Museum (Weil am Rhein, Germany), the Museo do Design of the Cultural Centre of Belem (Lisbon) and the Museo del Design della Triennale in Milan.  via  experimenta magazine

 

  A pair of "Torso" high back sculptural chairs redone in silver Pewter leather designed by Paolo Deganello for Cassina in 1982. Visually interesting and comfortable.


A pair of “Torso” high back sculptural chairs redone in silver Pewter leather designed by Paolo Deganello for Cassina in 1982. Visually interesting and comfortable.

 

 

Paolo Deganello, Regina chairs for Zanotta Italy 1991 Designer: Paolo Deganello Provenance: Italy Material: Leather & Cowskin

Paolo Deganello Regina chairs for Zanotta Italy 1991
Designer: Paolo Deganello
Provenance: Italy
Material: Leather & Cowskin

 

 

mies’ chaise longue, 1969. design archizoom .manufactured by poltronova. courtesy paolo deganello

mies’ chaise longue, 1969.
design archizoom .manufactured by poltronova.
courtesy paolo deganello

 

 

Playful 80's Italian sofa with serious style. Seat in leather and back upholstered in a specially-commissioned Jack Lenor Larsen material entitled "La Madre" ("The Mother"). From Deganello's "Torso" series for Cassina. 1stdibs


Playful 80’s Italian sofa with serious style. Seat in leather and back upholstered in a specially-commissioned Jack Lenor Larsen material entitled “La Madre” (“The Mother”). From Deganello’s “Torso” series for Cassina. 1stdibs

 

                                                   AEO 1973

“When Paolo Deganello, cofounder of the Archizoom group from Florence, Italy, presented the “AEO” chair in 1973, it attracted great attention. The chair is undeniably comfortable, but opinions differ on its unusual appearance. One side regards it as a caricature of the robust television chair, the other as an icon of a new functional aesthetic.   Deganello does not comply with a particular aesthetic convention but instead sets the different qualities off against each other.”  Vitra Design Museum

 

Vitra Design Museum Design: 1973 Production: 1973 to the present Manufacturer: Cassina

Vitra Design Museum
Design: 1973
Production: 1973 to the present
Manufacturer: Cassina

 

 “We need to turn design inside out, like a glove”

Paolo Deganello  06/30/2010

Based on his participation in the seminar Less is Next held on World Food Day, Paolo Deganello uses the crisis as a starting point to reflect upon the kind of role architects and designers should play in organising a fairer professional practice, rooted in the defence of new, ethical values.

He goes on to say, “now that we are faced with economic crisis and the ever more dramatic destruction of the planet’s resources. My proposal, which I had already been advocating for some years, was that we must change all our schools of design into schools of socially responsible and/or sustainable design.”

from Experimenta Magazine Spain

learn more from Paolo Deganello, watch the video My Radical Project Architecture and Eco Design

Architects and Their Chairs “C”

Posted by Lynne van den Berg On June 10th

        C is for Castiglioni

 

 

 “Start from scratch. Stick to common sense. Know your goals and means”.

Achille Castiglioni (February 26, 1918 – December 2, 2002) was a renowned Italian industrial designer. He was often inspired by everyday things and made use of ordinary materials.He preferred to use a minimal amount of materials to create forms with maximal effect.

Achille Castiglioni was born in Milan and studied architecture at the Politecnico di Milano University and set up a design office in 1944 with his brothers, Livioioni Castiglioni and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni. In 1956, Castiglioni founded the Associazione per il Disegno Industriale (Association for Industrial Design, ADI). Castiglioni taught for many years, first at the Politecnico di Torino, and in 1969 he led a class in Industrial Design at the Politecnico di Milano.

MoMA’s permanent collection in New York hosts 14 of his works. Other works may be found in the following museums: Victoria and Albert Museum in London, Kunstgewerbe Museum in Zurich, Staatliches Museum für Angewandte Kunst in Munich, Design Museum in Prato, Uneleckoprumyslove Museum in Prague, Israel Museum in Jerusalem, The Denver Art Museum, Vitra Design Museum in Weil am Rhein, Angewandte Kunst Museum in Hamburg and Koln

 

 

 

Sanluca, designed in 1960 by Achille and Pier Giacomo, is a modern take on the traditional lounge chair - See more at: http://www.italymagazine.com/featured-story/three-best-italian-lounge-chairs#sthash.wLMLWGNv.dpuf

Sanluca, designed in 1960 by Achille and Pier Giacomo, is a modern take on the traditional lounge chair – See more at: http://www.italymagazine.com/featured-story/three-best-italian-lounge-chairs

 

 

Achille Castiglioni . sancarlo, for Tacchini http://www.tacchini.it/

Achille Castiglioni . sancarlo, for Tacchini
http://www.tacchini.it/

 

 

Achille Castiglioni, Sella telephone stool, 1957, for Zanotta (designed with Pier Giacomo Castiglioni).

Achille Castiglioni, Sella telephone stool, 1957, for Zanotta (designed with Pier Giacomo Castiglioni).

 

 

1980's 'vintage' Leonardo table, Achille Castiglioni Architectural trestle work table Pin by Ryan Tam on Tables | Pinterest

1980’s ‘vintage’ Leonardo table, Achille Castiglioni Architectural trestle work table
Pin by Ryan Tam on Tables | Pinterest

 

 

the achille castiglioni effect www.designboom.com

the achille castiglioni effect
www.designboom.com

 

 

The famous Arco Floor Lamp with its elegant marble base was designed in 1962 by Achille Castiglioni and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni for the Italian manufacturer Flos.

The famous Arco Floor Lamp with its elegant marble base was designed in 1962 by Achille Castiglioni and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni for the Italian manufacturer Flos.

 

 

Design is one of the highest expressions of twentieth-century creativity, and Achille Castiglioni is one of its greatest masters. His objects stand as clear examples of rigorous method, technical skill, exuberant talent, and wit, combined to achieve a beauty that is fulfilling on both a rational and an emotional level. His work exemplifies the ideal of good design.

With his functional and purist yet playful objects, Castiglioni has shown that form and function, while certainly the main ingredients for successful design, cannot be a designer’s only concerns. He has thus contributed invaluably to updating modernist design to contemporary modern.

Paola Antonelli
Associate Curator
Department of Architecture and Design

Excerpt from MOMA exhibition

 

Overview of all products by designer Achille Castiglioni

 

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